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'a clever twisted journey into a former junkie's world...' DIY Film Festival

GoneQuiet and hard working, Mike is a young man who works and lives in the city.  Due to a dark past, he is forbidden by law to be in his home town and have any prior contacts.  One phone call four years later will change all of this and Mike will be forced to return home.  With help form some of Mike's old friends and family, he will do what he can to make things right.  But can he do it in the place where he is forbidden?

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AWARDS

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REVIEWS

Rogue Cinema - Gone Review
rogue cinema
Film Reviews: Gone (2012) - By Brian Morton
Posted on Sunday, March 03, 2013 @ 09:53:46 Mountain Standard Time by Duane

 


 

You’ve heard it since you were a kid; the past will catch up with you. And, if you live long enough, you’ll actually see it happen…whether it’s to you or to someone else, it really happens! Well, a new movie from Silent Partner Productions, Gone, manages to capture that old saying on film, and they throw in a dash of revenge for good measure!

Gone is the story of Mike, a former junkie who’s not allowed back to his hometown for crimes in his past. When Mike learns of his brother’s death, he heads back home anyway to attend the funeral, be with family and find out what happened. When he finds out that his brother was killed, Mike makes it his mission to find out who killed him and exact his revenge, all while being tailed by two cops who want to take Mike back to prison.

Gone’s an interesting little movie, John Brotherton is perfect as Mike, a guy who’s trying to get his act together, only to feel like he’s being dragged back into the mess he’s left behind and writer/director Matthew McLaughlin has crafted a story that’s both well told, and well crafted…and yes, there is a difference!

Gone manages to time jump a bit, but does it in a way to make the story just that much better! I’m giving Gone 4 out of 4 cigars, I’d love to see Mike return to his hometown again…or maybe just help someone else’s hometown! You can find out more, including where to catch this excellent pic, by heading over to http://www.silentpp.com.

 

Film Threat - Gone Review

film threat

GONE

gone mainSStar4Star4
Year Released: 2010
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Running Time: 75 minutes
Written and directed by Matthew McLaughlin
Scored by Steven McLaughlin
Featuring John Brotherton, Allison Raimondi, Marlo King, Jeffrey Holt

Matthew McLaughlin’s Gone is a moody, minimalistic, psychological thriller with the hybrid feel of a neo-noir, classic western. The result is smooth and slow vigilante justice.

Based upon actual events, the film follows Mike MacGregor (John Brotherton), a man with a sketchy, criminal past. MacGregor returns to his family home 4 years after his trial, to avenge the mysterious death of his brother James. Slithering in the shadows— just barely below the radar of the 2 cops who had dealings with him in the past, Mike pieces together the puzzle of a complex homicide.

While Gone is not without certain flaws, such as the occasional scene at night that’s way too muddy-dark— and monotones that sometimes grate— it’s a very well written movie with true moments of brilliance. Matthew McLaughlin’s artful, cinematic probe into Mike’s psyche, as the character stirs a cup of coffee— and thereby revisits disturbing events of his past— is truly exquisite.

Equally amazing is Steven McLaughlin’s original score that acts as an eerie narrator, moving the story along, with sound effects that are fueled by cinematic flashes of fire. Gone is further strengthened by its lack of bloody gore and by excellent acting. Special kudos are given to John Brotherton, Allison Raimondi, as Mike’s girlfriend, Katie, and Diana Parks, as the junkie-ex of the decedent.

And as the film closes upon Mike’s slow walk into the sunset, we are left with the burning question of whether vigilantism is ever okay under any circumstances, and what exactly that means.

This film was submitted for review through our Submission for Review system. If you have a film you’d like us to see, and we aren’t already looking into it on our own, you too can utilize this service.


Posted on March 3, 2013 in Reviews by Amy R. Handler

Rogue Cinema - Gone Review
rogue cinema
Film Reviews: Gone (2012) - By Brian Morton
Posted on Sunday, March 03, 2013 @ 09:53:46 Mountain Standard Time by Duane

 


 

You’ve heard it since you were a kid; the past will catch up with you. And, if you live long enough, you’ll actually see it happen…whether it’s to you or to someone else, it really happens! Well, a new movie from Silent Partner Productions, Gone, manages to capture that old saying on film, and they throw in a dash of revenge for good measure!

Gone is the story of Mike, a former junkie who’s not allowed back to his hometown for crimes in his past. When Mike learns of his brother’s death, he heads back home anyway to attend the funeral, be with family and find out what happened. When he finds out that his brother was killed, Mike makes it his mission to find out who killed him and exact his revenge, all while being tailed by two cops who want to take Mike back to prison.

Gone’s an interesting little movie, John Brotherton is perfect as Mike, a guy who’s trying to get his act together, only to feel like he’s being dragged back into the mess he’s left behind and writer/director Matthew McLaughlin has crafted a story that’s both well told, and well crafted…and yes, there is a difference!

Gone manages to time jump a bit, but does it in a way to make the story just that much better! I’m giving Gone 4 out of 4 cigars, I’d love to see Mike return to his hometown again…or maybe just help someone else’s hometown! You can find out more, including where to catch this excellent pic, by heading over to http://www.silentpp.com.

 

Film Threat - Gone Review

film threat

GONE

gone mainSStar4Star4
Year Released: 2010
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Running Time: 75 minutes
Written and directed by Matthew McLaughlin
Scored by Steven McLaughlin
Featuring John Brotherton, Allison Raimondi, Marlo King, Jeffrey Holt

Matthew McLaughlin’s Gone is a moody, minimalistic, psychological thriller with the hybrid feel of a neo-noir, classic western. The result is smooth and slow vigilante justice.

Based upon actual events, the film follows Mike MacGregor (John Brotherton), a man with a sketchy, criminal past. MacGregor returns to his family home 4 years after his trial, to avenge the mysterious death of his brother James. Slithering in the shadows— just barely below the radar of the 2 cops who had dealings with him in the past, Mike pieces together the puzzle of a complex homicide.

While Gone is not without certain flaws, such as the occasional scene at night that’s way too muddy-dark— and monotones that sometimes grate— it’s a very well written movie with true moments of brilliance. Matthew McLaughlin’s artful, cinematic probe into Mike’s psyche, as the character stirs a cup of coffee— and thereby revisits disturbing events of his past— is truly exquisite.

Equally amazing is Steven McLaughlin’s original score that acts as an eerie narrator, moving the story along, with sound effects that are fueled by cinematic flashes of fire. Gone is further strengthened by its lack of bloody gore and by excellent acting. Special kudos are given to John Brotherton, Allison Raimondi, as Mike’s girlfriend, Katie, and Diana Parks, as the junkie-ex of the decedent.

And as the film closes upon Mike’s slow walk into the sunset, we are left with the burning question of whether vigilantism is ever okay under any circumstances, and what exactly that means.

This film was submitted for review through our Submission for Review system. If you have a film you’d like us to see, and we aren’t already looking into it on our own, you too can utilize this service.


Posted on March 3, 2013 in Reviews by Amy R. Handler